Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Outer Banks

To All Members, Friends, and Guests of UUCOB:

We, the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Outer Banks, extend a warm welcome t
o you. We invite you to join us in the celebration of life and the search for its meaning. Our members form a diverse group with various religious backgrounds.

  • Have you felt a need for a spiritual community that values your whole life, welcoming you as you are and recognizing that every life has extraordinary possibilities?
  • Have you ever wished for a religious community that finds inspiration in all the world’s religious traditions, in nature’s beauty, in poetry, stories, music, and art, and in the discoveries of science?
  • Have you wondered if faith and love could guide spiritual and religious people to work for equity and justice, for peace and freedom, for equal rights for all people in this world, in this lifetime?
  • Have you wanted to be part of a community of love who celebrate each other’s joys, who comfort and support each other in times of trouble, who strengthen and encourage each other for the work of making a better world, and who welcome and celebrate each other’s quest for truth and meaning?

For over 30 years the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Outer Banks has been building just such a spiritual community.  We would love to share it with you.  We hope you’ll enjoy exploring this website and our Facebook page, but most of all we would be glad to welcome you to a Sunday service at our Meetinghouse on Kitty Hawk Road.  Come as you are!


SUNDAY SERVICE – July 21, 2019, 10:30am
Jonathan Marcus   “Everything is Happening at Once”
Sharp, funny, and irreverent, Jonathan will share moments from his memoir, “Everything is Happening at Once” and explore the spiritual aspects of engaging with a cult-like intellectual band of highly inquisitive, talented seekers.  Marcus spent twenty years as a member of a semi-secret group, working to explode unconscious habits as one of the ways to find meaning in the chaos and wonder of everyday life. His stories instantly transport you on a wild ride from constructive blasphemy and tribal joy to astrophysics.

Jonathan will stay after the service to answer questions and will have some books to sell.

NEWS & NOTES
Attention Men of UUCOB:  For his July 28th service, “What Kind of Man Are You?” Rev. David would like to include thoughts and comments from YOU about what it means to be a man today, and how you may have been touched, moved, or changed by recent conversations such as the “Me, Too” movement, scandals involving sexual misconduct by public figures, and the growing inclusion of gay and trans men in our understanding of what “masculinity” might mean.  Please contact him with your thoughts: revdamorris@gmail.com or (925) 914-7353.

REMINDER
Anyone Sing For Fun…Each Tuesday evening from 5 to 6 PM
Open to all. Not just for women anymore!
This is a casual affair, where we sing rounds, Beatles, chants, hymns, really anything that is for fun.This is summer. Please come join us. Bring an idea of a song you want to sing. We may even hook up the karaoke! This new program is coordinated by Nancy Byrne and Lee Fallon.

COMING SOON:  Children’s Sunday Program:
We are hoping to restart a more structured program for children on Sunday mornings and we need your help. Parents, grandparents, interested members and friends please tell us what you want to see us offer.  All suggestions, input, or offers to help appreciated. Contact:  Donna Mohler at mohlerdonna1@gmail.com.

REV. DAVID’S QUOTE OF THE WEEK
Author and activist James Baldwin (1924 – 1987) wrote:
“I imagine one of the reasons people cling to their hates so stubbornly is because they sense, once hate is gone, they will be forced to deal with pain.”

Baldwin did not intend to give people a pass for their hateful actions by any stretch of the imagination. Yet how would it affect our approach to those we disagree with if we focused, not on criticizing their wrongs, but on curiosity about the pain hiding behind their hates? What would change if we recognized and brought into conversation our own pain, rather than expressing hate for those doing what we see as wrong?