Category Archives: Newsletters

Annual Report 2016-2017

 Download the UUCOB Annual Report 2016-17(pdf) Best for printing!

 ANNUAL REPORT – FY 2016-17

June 11, 2017
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CONGREGATION OF THE OUTER BANKS

ANNUAL MEETING
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CONGREGATION OF THE OUTER BANKS
SUNDAY, JUNE 11, 2017
12:00 Noon
UUCOB Meetinghouse

1. Chalice Lighting

2. Reading of the Covenant
We believe in freedom, love, and reason in religion.

We commit ourselves to an organized religious community, recognizing the greater effectiveness of common effort.  We come together to enrich our spiritual lives, to share our ideals, and to increase our sensitivity to the needs of others.

We believe we can achieve our goals without conforming to set theological doctrines.

We welcome and offer friendship to kindred spirits of any race, nationality, sexual orientation or religious background.

Within the limits of our abilities and in keeping with our personal choices, we dedicate our time, effort, and financial support to this Congregation.

3. UUCOB Annual Report

 4. Recognition of Volunteers

 5. Adoption of FY 2017-2018 Budget

 6. Election of Board & Committee Chairs

 7. Declaration of Conscience

 8. Other Business/Comments

 9. Adjournment

Minister’s Report

What a pleasure it has been for me to share a second year of ministry with this vibrant, warm, imaginative, talented, and committed religious community!  This has been a very rich year in the life of our congregation.

Since last June’s Congregational Meeting we’ve welcomed new members and said goodbye to beloved people.  In terms of simple numbers we’ve grown our membership and increased our Sunday attendance appreciably.  Beyond numbers, we have added wonderful folks to our community who have quickly found their way into the engaged, embracing way of life that is such an important part of UUCOB’s special character. There are many ways of considering the growth of a congregation, and it’s my feeling that we’ve grown again this year not just numerically but in community, in active participation by members and friends, in our sense of engagement with the larger community around us, and in the spiritual grounding that’s always vital, and never more so than in troubled times like we’re living in today.

On Sunday mornings we’ve explored, laughed, and grieved together, called ourselves toward engagement with issues of justice and equity in the wider world and our own Unitarian Universalist Association, explored new ideas and old traditions, lifted our voices in song, embraced new video technology, and heard the ancient sound of the psaltery.  It has been my great pleasure both to lead and to attend worship services that are spiritually vibrant, emotionally rich, and intellectually challenging.  Many hands go into making our Sunday mornings a consistently meaningful and powerful experience of both worship and community! The many gifts of our musical members have enriched our services immensely. It has also been a year full of thought-provoking, heartfelt sermons from the alumni of last year’s Shared Pulpit sermon-writing seminar, an 8-week exploration that will definitely make a return appearance every few years.  We’ve heard from guest ministers exchanging pulpits with me, a practice that lets our congregations hear a variety of voices and ministers experience worship with other UU congregations, and from Outer Banks community leaders.

We’ve had two congregational conversations this year about social justice, considering together the role of a congregation that’s heir to the Unitarian Universalist tradition of justice-seeking in a challenging social and political climate.  I believe the embers of a new, communal commitment to working for justice have been kindled, and I look forward to continuing this process and progress together.

I’m celebrating a year of abundance in our financial generosity this year as well.  The smooth and effective Pledge Drive not only reached but exceeded the goal the Board and Finance Committee set.  Our concerts were delightful, and our two annual Auctions brought in as much or even more than ever.  The commitment and support that is shared across the congregation makes many things possible.

On a sadder note, this year we’ve said farewell to some longtime members who have been pivotal in the life of UUCOB over the years.  John and Laura Gilson left us for Norfolk, and late this spring our last active founding members Bill and Peggy Birkemeier departed for their new home in the Triangle.  And with tears, laughter, and the solace of good company in a Celebration of Life on May 12th, we sent our beloved Jennifer Frost, who died April 29th, into the Mystery with our blessing.  These stalwart and loyal folks have been vital presences in our congregation, and we will miss them for a long time to come.

This has been a satisfying year in my own ministry, as we have deepened our relationship, sustained and nurtured the many strong aspects of UCCOB’s life, and explored new possibilities and ideas together.  I hope that I will continue to grow my own knowledge and skill as the minister of a congregation our size, and that together we will keep finding ways to strengthen our shared ministries.  I am particularly hopeful that in the coming year(s) I can help to empower and encourage parents and non-parents to come together and begin to offer intentional and engaging faith development activities for our children and youth.  Though small in number, our core of young UUs is growing once more, and they need us all to support them in their growth and development.

It’s also been a pleasure for me to have UUCOB as such a strong foundation for my participation in the North Dare Ministerial Association, which this year took several steps toward embracing a more visible public presence in ministry to the wider community.  It’s an honor to be part of that group of good colleagues of many faiths.

Finally, I’m grateful for all our many dedicated UUCOB leaders and volunteers, who “make church happen” for all of us from week to week and year to year.  To thank everyone individually would practically be a roll call of the congregation, but I do want to especially lift up Joe Heard, who has given so generously of his time, energy, and skill in his multiple terms as Board President.  It has been a gift to work with such a steady, positive, empowering leader, and I thank Joe and hope he feels well celebrated as his term ends.  I also want to call out Sherrie Lemnios for all the many and varied ways her hard work and skill add richness to our congregational life.  These two role models of devotion are joined by a remarkable cadre willing and cheerfully committed leaders on the Board and active committees, and you are all a blessing to this community.

Thank you, UUCOB, for a wonderful year together.  I look forward to what’s ahead for us!

In faith and appreciation–

Your minister, David

President’s Report

Dear Members and Friends of the UUCOB,

Eight years ago, I was invited to lunch by UUCOB President Fran Green and former (and now incoming) President Jennifer Gilbreath.  I may not have known the topic of discussion, but I knew that with those two partnering, I would likely be saying, “Yes”.  That July, I found myself as President of the UUCOB.

Over the subsequent eight years, I’ve worked alongside dozens of members and friends to keep our congregation’s vibrant presence in our larger Outer Banks community.  In that period of time, we’ve progressed as a congregation and are moving forward in a wonderful direction.  However, upon looking back, it’s been a bit of a roller coaster ride.  During our years of economic recession, our attendance rarely exceeded 25 people at a Sunday service, membership dwindled to the mid-30s, and our finances were stretched to the point that we had to withdraw money from our investments to balance our budget.  As I step back from my role as President, I’m glad to see that we’ve seen a consistent growth of positive energy, activity, membership, and financial stability in our congregation over the past few years, truly blossoming under the guidance of Rev. David Morris.

During the past year, I’ve watched Rev. Morris gradually develop his relationship with our congregation and shift confidently into his role as a resource, advisor, facilitator, and leader.  With his guidance, our congregation seems to have a found a nice rhythm moving forward and I expect even greater progress as new leaders, with new ideas and energy, come on board in July.  I’m pleased about where we’re at and where we’re heading.

This positive energy has become most apparent during our Sunday morning services.  Building on the successful efforts of Lola Davis-Jones, Co-Chair Rose Clark, Co-Chair Rosemary Rawlins, and the other members of the Program Committee have provided ideas, organization, and training for those involved with our Sunday services.  In response to the needs of our congregation and community, Rev. Morris has brought issues surrounding social justice to the forefront of his sermons and services.  The participants in our Shared Pulpit sermon-writing seminar have spoken thoughtfully on issues close to their hearts.  Guest ministers have provided a different, refreshing perspective on issues of importance to us as Unitarian Universalists.  Nancy Byrne’s leadership with the music program has provided high-quality musical offerings on a weekly basis.  These services provide our congregation with a time for spiritual growth, learning, sharing, and calling to action.  Each Sunday, I enjoy seeing both new faces and returning faces as they find a spiritual home at the UUCOB.

As President, I have the opportunity to witness much of the work that goes into keeping our congregation a vital and vibrant part of our community.  There is much work done behind the scenes and I would like to recognize the following people for their significant volunteer efforts on behalf of our congregation:

  • Like clockwork, Co-Chairs of the Building & Grounds Committee, Kent Zimmerman and Dennis Tromba complete the necessary tasks to keep our buildings functioning and improving our property.
  • Chair Kathy McMahan and the Communications Committee keep us informed and enhance UUCOB’s image through various methods of communication.  For many visitors or new residents to the Outer Banks, our website or a Facebook post may be their first opportunity to explore what the UUCOB has to offer.
  • Finance Committee Chair Sherrie Lemnios invigorates our congregation and Meetinghouse with art exhibits and successful fund-raising auctions and concerts that serve as social events for our members and friends, as well as serving an important role in meeting our congregation’s budget.
  • Treasurer Sandy Anderson fulfills an important role tracking income, expenses, and pledges.  We’re very thankful for Sandy’s dedication.
  • Chair Ellen Berg and the Membership Committee have had a very successful year welcoming new members and friends to our congregation (our membership is greater than its been in over a decade).  We also appreciate the greeters and sextons who have worked with Ellen to help us prepare for service each Sunday.
  • Vice-President Bryan Jones has developed solutions to many of the technical needs and challenges faced by or congregation (sound system, screen, printing, computers).
  • Our Nominating Committee – Rose Clark, Pat Smrdel, and Sherrie Lemnios – did a wonderful job of finding well-qualified individuals to serve important roles within our congregation.  I’m excited to see the new names nominated for positions on the UUCOB Board and committee chairs for next year.
  • Joan Liston has a leadership role with our Women’s Journey Group, communicates with our out-of-town members/former members, and helps coordinate our congregation’s efforts to provide care and comfort to those in need in our congregation.
  • Nellie Dixon has been very involved with UUCOB fund-raisers, coordinates our weekly orders of service, and stepped up to assist Treasurer Sandy Anderson for several months this past year.
  • Jennifer Gilbreath was instrumental in organizing several of our holiday services.
  • Christopher Nave is involved with seemingly every event, dedicated as a sexton, and generous in many ways (and I’m not just thinking about his Sunday morning cookies).
  • Nick Hodsdon dedicates many hours of his time to keep our UUCOB grounds looking attractive and Meetinghouse in an orderly fashion.

To these and all others who’ve volunteered their time and efforts to assist our congregation – Thank you!

Joe Heard, President

Treasurer

As I complete my third year as Treasurer of the UUCOB, I’ve had a very pleasant surprise.  Dave Feild, one of our congregation’s newest members, was appointed by the Board to serve as Co-Treasurer and assist with the bookkeeping duties, freeing me to focus on the day-to-day financial duties.  Dave will be a wonderful asset to our congregation as he has skills and experience from years of working with nonprofits.  I want to thank Vincent Berg and Nellie Dixon for stepping up to fill this role in the interim over the past year.  Your efforts were greatly appreciated!

I’m pleased to report that our FY 2017-18 pledge drive has been very successful.  Thanks to a few recent pledges and new members joining our congregation, we have exceeded our budgeted goal.  Fulfilling our budget goal will allow our congregation to provide a fair increase in the compensation for our minister and allow the congregation to build up a contingency fund for major building and grounds projects in future years.  Thanks to all our loyal supporters.

The past year has been successful financially for the UUCOB.  We’ve had very positive revenues generated by fulfillment of our pledges, other donations, rental revenue from our tenants, and fundraisers.  With no major building repair or unexpected expenses, our leadership and committees have kept spending well within the budget, leading to a successful financial year.

Our thanks to Finance Chair Sherrie Lemnios and all those who helped with organizing, preparing, and participating in fundraisers this past year.  We had a very active year of fundraising which generated almost $8,000 for our congregation, exceeding our budgeted goal of $7,000.

A copy of the UUCOB financial report through May 2017 will be distributed at the annual meeting.

Sandy Anderson, Treasurer

Program Committee

The program committee works alongside the minister with input from the Lay Leader and Music teams to develop a strong and diverse offering of program elements to provide stimulating Sunday Services each week for the congregation. A full range of topics, special and annual occasions, inter-generational services, and other elements of interest to the congregation are determined. From time to time suggestions are solicited from the congregation.

2016-17 has been a vibrant year at the UU. The program committee has been working to provide worship services that resonate, and we feel it’s paying off because our congregation is growing due to positive word of mouth in the community. This year, we welcomed twelve new members into the congregation, and we recognized eleven of those new members in person at our pledge drive launch.

This year, the program committee incorporated the use of themes for our services such as Hope, Unity, Power, Restoration, Families, and Truth, each with several thematic subsets to encourage variety and keep fresh topics coming.

“The Shared Pulpit” class that Rev. David offered in 2015-16 produced interesting presentations from members of the congregation who completed this class including sermons delivered by Nellie Dixon, Lola Davis Jones, Joan Liston, Nancy Byrne and two talks each by Bryan Jones and Rosemary Rawlins. This class has proven to be a good source of lay leader presentations, and may be offered again.

Many sermons this year have centered on issues brought to the forefront by the result of our Presidential election and what that has meant for our community and country. A few topics were: Recovering Patriotism, A Moral Revolution, A Place of Refuge (about sanctuary), Will the Center Hold, and a sermon by visiting Rev. Judith Dancy who changed her topic last minute to offer solace to the congregation right after the Presidential election since David had to be out of town.

With input from the Program Committee and minister, some elements of our weekly service have been changed this year, such as adding two candles to the joy and sorrows table to represent the concerns we all hold about the current leadership in our country and the harm many people face today. This has had the positive effect of limiting the joys and sorrows we share with each other to our personal ones, so we may remain informed and engaged in each other’s lives.

The committee has also refined our strategies for assigning lay leaders and musicians so we can spend less time on who’s doing what and more time talking about components of building our services. Our monthly meetings are dedicated to determining what works and what doesn’t work at each service. We review all service elements, feedback, and attendance, and we work to fix problems as quickly as possible.

As a committee, we have tried to schedule services as far out as possible to reduce confusion and last minute chaos in planning. This has generally been going a bit smoother. When we heard complaints that we were running out of Teal Hymnals, we ran a successful book drive and purchased and engraved twenty-five new hymnals for the church.

Two of the major technical issues we corrected this year include obtaining a large LCD TV to use for services and other events, and the purchase of a new photocopier to make the printing of the Order of Service handouts easier for sextons.

To enhance the family experience at the UU, the Program Committee has also recently begun putting out yellow floor cushions as a designated space for children, and several young ones have made use of them.

As our fiscal year winds down, we are focusing on where and how our congregation can aid local vulnerable communities and the Program Committee along with the congregation is working to determine where our efforts will be most impactful. We’ve held congregational conversations after church to discuss social justice activities like possibly working more closely with Mano al Hermano and the undocumented community since several people in the congregation volunteer for this organization. In addition, Rev. David is currently working on preparing a white supremacy teach-in with a group of helpers. There has also been an interest in providing an educational forum and possibly other support for the LGBTQ community.

Rev. Morris responded rapidly to events affecting the community this year; an example is the impromptu gathering he held after the election, so people had a place to safely express their anger or grief. We are grateful for his flexibility and willingness to jump in when needs arise.

Rose Clark & Rosemary Rawlins, Program Committee Co-Chairs

Program Committee Members:  Rev. David Morris, Nancy Byrne, Lola Davis Jones, Joan Liston, Dennis Tromba

Lay Leader Team: Sandy Anderson, Rose Clark, Lola Davis Jones, Nellie Dixon, Jennifer Gilbreath, Burnham Gould, Bryan Jones, Joan Liston, Gwen Taylor

Musical Director: Nancy Byrne

Buildings & Grounds Committee

In addition to the normal and routine mowing of grass and general upkeep, the B&G Committee has performed some other jobs this year.

  1. Heron Pond toilets were stopped up on a couple occasions. In the process of getting those clean and running we met Kenny Russell, a plumber who has been a very good find for us.  We will be using Kenny in the future.
  2. The security lights on either end of the front porch have been an ongoing problem. They were both replaced with new, more efficient LED lighting.
  3. We have contracted with Atlantic Sewage to pump the septic tank. No one could remember when it was done last.  June 5th is the magic day, as Heron Pond will be on break. This should be put on a regular schedule.
  4. We have contracted with Kitty Hawk Garden Center to redo the landscaping on the north side of the building facing Kitty Hawk Road. This work will be performed in June 2017.  The flower bed will be enlarged, and new plantings will be done.
  5. The brush in the drainage ditch was cut back and removed.
  6. The grass area next to the parking lot was filled and reseeded.
  7. Fill was added to the playground.
  8. The elevator was serviced.

Kent Zimmerman & Dennis Tromba, Building & Grounds Co-Chairs

Membership Committee

I’m pleased to report that our membership has grown to 54 members, the highest that its been in over a decade.  14 new members have joined the UUCOB during the past year – Doug Bates, Susan Bates, Rose Clark, Lindsay Dubbs, Cathy Field, Dave Field, Laurel Hendrix, Marja Jenkins, Caroline Johnston, Merry Mendelson, Vickie Moore, Susan Pfaff, Angelo Sonnesso, and Gail Sonnesso.  It’s wonderful to see the energy and vitality these members have added to our congregation.

We greatly appreciate the efforts of our steady group volunteering for Sexton duties – Sandy Anderson, Ellen Berg, Nancy Byrne, Rose Clark, Nellie Dixon, Cathie Field, Dave Field, Jennifer Gilbreath, Caroline Johnston, Joan Liston, Merry Mendelson, Christopher Nave, Rosemary Rawlins, Skyler Yan, and Kent Zimmerman, and Sara Zimmerman (I hope I haven’t forgotten anyone).  Thank you all for your assistance on Sunday mornings!

We have seen an upward trend in attendance this past year, due to the efforts of our Program Committee and Minister David Morris to provide thoughtful, engaging services.  Attendance at Sunday morning services has grown steadily over the past year, from an average of approximately 30 attendees in July 2016 to an average of over 40 attendees during the recent months of March and April 2017.

To facilitate connections and communication among our congregation, we created a directory of UUCOB members and friends during the past year.

To welcome visitors, we installed a sign that says “Parking for First Time Visitor to UUCOB” placed at the head of a parking space near the front entrance.

Ellen Berg, Membership Chair

Pastoral Care Committee

During the past year, our committee has stayed in close touch to discuss the needs and concerns of our congregants.  We have delivered flowers to the sick, a member whose father passed away and sent multiple cards, often signed by the attending members of the congregation, for illnesses, close family deaths, and celebrations.  When long time members were moving to a condo in Norfolk, Dick Liston framed a photo of the church as a gift and a large cake was ordered to say good-bye.  Calls were made to people who were recovering from longer illnesses and at times meals were delivered and we solicited others to also contribute.

Christmas cards and more recently invitations to the 30th anniversary were sent to 25 former active members.

We have appreciated input from other congregants when there were needs to be met of which we were unaware and would ask for this to continue.

Joan Liston, Gwen Taylor & Sara Zimmerman, Pastoral Care Committee Members

Communications Committee

During the past year, the Communications Committee has worked on the following projects:

  • Compiled and emailed UUCOB weekly announcements.
  • Edited, produced and distributed the monthly UUCOB newsletter.
  • Sent other announcements as necessary.
  • Dick Liston and Christopher Nave posted information to the UUCOB website.
  • Jennifer Gilbreath updated information on the UUCOB calendar.
  • Christopher Nave and others were active in sharing information about UUCOB and UUCOB events on Facebook.
  • Updated membership and friends lists.

Kathy McMahan, Communications Committee Chair

Finance Committee

The Finance Committee has had a successful year.  With Nellie Dixon and Peggy Birkemeier leading the way with the new software program, we had a profitable Goods and Services Auction that ran very smoothly.  Additional fund raising events included the Chocolate Auction and three “Music at the Meetinghouse” concerts: (1) Ruth Wyand concert sponsored by the N.C. Humanities Council so that we could keep all the proceeds, (2) Riff Tides concert which was very popular; and (3) Mojo Collins concert paired with his Art Show Opening.  These events brought in $7,440 exceeding our fundraising goal by 6.3%.

The Pledge Drive, the main responsibility of the Finance Committee, was also a success, meeting our goal of $41,380 for pledges for FY 2017-18.  Sandy Anderson did a great job of distributing pledge materials and six long-time members of UUCOB gave testimonials during the services during the pledge drive.  The Preliminary Budget was presented to the congregation on April 23, the last day of the drive.

We are very pleased that new member, Dave Feild will complete the term of Assistant Treasurer to the end of FY 2018.  Dave has had a lot of experience in finance in non-profit organizations.

Sherrie Lemnios, Finance Chair
Committee Members: Sandy Anderson, Dave Feild & Bryan Jones

Technical Committee

It certainly was an interesting year on the technical front.  It was sort of like the Building & Grounds Committee’s challenges of a year ago, but without heat pumps.

We have replaced the EFL bulbs in the sanctuary ceiling fixtures with LED lamps.  It has reduced glare to some extent, and the LED lamps are even more energy efficient and have a warranty that runs until I’m 96.  So, someone else will replace them next time.

The computer we have been using, courtesy of Laura Gilson, finally stopped being really usable.  We replaced it with a laptop with a current operating system that is also usable when we have auctions and other events.  It is hooked up to the main printer, as our old HP printer went to that big recycle in the sky.

We have a newer sound system.  I purchased it from a church that was upgrading theirs.  It is more versatile than our old one, and doesn’t hum as the old one did.  There has been a learning curve, but I think we have a handle on it.

It’s possible you have noticed the video screen in the northeast corner of the sanctuary.  We have started using it within services, and I expect we will find other uses for it as we become more accustomed to having it here.  It certainly beats the heck out of the projector and screen.

We have also replaced the copier/scanner/printer with a higher speed, easier to use, black and white laser model.  The old printer was getting cranky and difficult, not unlike myself.  It has been explained to me that the instructions are not clear – or at least literal – enough.  This brings us to Future Endeavors.

1) We will be adding a dimmer to the six LED lights that are currently on/off only, so we can regulate them in a more aesthetically pleasing manner, particularly for events.
2) We will be tidying up the cables to the video screen and covering them to make them more pleasing also.
3) The wifi connection between the minister’s office and the treasurer’s office often acts as though someone placed lead shielding between them.  This appears not to be the case – I’ve checked –  so we will be placing an extender into the system for better communications.
4) The wireless microphone problems will be fixed, if it requires the intervention of Guglielmo Marconi himself. (He would ask: “Cosa diavolo è il tuo problema?”)

So, audio systems, video, computer, wifi system, lighting, copier – piece of cake, that.

Bryan Jones, Vice-President

Art Exhibits

We have had a wide variety of art exhibits this past year.  We started out with a showing of work created by the clients of GEM in several mediums and some of the teachers art also.  Next we had Linda Lauby, photographer, restaurant designer, publisher and all-around creative person, show her unusual abstract photographs made by layering many images.   She was followed by Yen Fine who exhibited her exquisite paintings in watercolor and oil.

We had a first ever art show and concert combined by Mojo Collins, local music legend.  His beautiful paintings on found wood are a new endeavor for him and his concert was well-received.  In March, Jane Manolas exhibited her photographs which were excellent especially for a high school student.  April brought back a sampling of quilts made by the Linus Quilt Project.  These quilts will go to children who are in the custody of Social Services or who are ill.  The current show consists of the combined work of Jerry Pontes and the other local artists who share studio space in a working gallery in Kill Devil Hills.

Sherrie Lemnios & Gwen Taylor, Art Show Committee

UUCOB Budget (Proposed)

Please see the UUCOB Annual Report 2016-17 6-11-17 pdf for a properly formatted view.

NOMINATING COMMITTEE SLATE

(For Consideration by the UUCOB Congregation on June 11, 2017)
*The following persons are nominated for the terms beginning July 1, 2017.

 

POSITION TERM NAME
President 2017-2019 * Jennifer Gilbreath
Vice President 2016-2018 Bryan Jones
Secretary 2017-2019 * Merry Mendelson
Co-Treasurer 2016-2018 Sandy Anderson
Co-Treasurer 2016-2018 Dave Feild
     
STANDING COMMITEES    
Membership Chair 2017-2019 * Christopher Nave
Finance Chair 2016-2018 Sherrie Lemnios
Buildings & Grounds Co-Chair 2016-2018 Kent Zimmerman
Buildings & Grounds Co-Chair 2016-2018 Dennis Tromba
Communications Chair 2017-2019 * Kathy McMahan
Programs Co-Chair 2016-2018 Rose Clark
Programs Co-Chair 2016-2018 Rosemary Rawlins
     
CONGREGATIONAL COMMITTEES    
Nominating Committee 2016-2018 Pat Smrdel
Nominating Committee 2017-2019 * Joe Heard
Audit Committee 2016-2018 Bernie Gould
Audit Committee 2017-2019 * Kent Zimmerman
Committee on Ministry 2015-2018 Kent Zimmerman
Committee on Ministry 2016-2019 Lola Davis-Jones
Committee on Ministry 2017-2020 * Nellie Dixon

Submitted by the Nominating Committee:
Rose Clark, Pat Smrdel, and Sherrie Lemnios

 

May 2017 Newsletter

Download the May 2017 Newsletter (pdf) Best for printing!

May 7 – Best Intentions: A UU White Supremacy Teach In – Reverend David Morris
A recent upheaval at the national level has revealed that our Unitarian Universalist Association, which has actively been in solidarity with movements to end racial oppression in our nation and world for almost two centuries, has somehow been unable to overcome persistent racial inequality in our own power structures and communities. At the call of Unitarian Universalist leaders of color, this Sunday we join over 600 of our sibling congregations nationwide to begin an exploration of white supremacy that looks close to home, not just t deliberately oppressive organizations. What has the word “supremacy” come to mean today? How have we arrived where we are–and what is our best hope for living more fully into our own vision of an undivided human family?

May 14 – Loving the Hell Out of the World
Rev. Andrew Millard, UU Fellowship of the Peninsula
The early Universalists rejected the Christian idea of Hell as an ultimate destination for human souls. Today, we understand the Universalist side of our tradition as proclaiming a shared destiny for all humanity. Of course, the manifestations of such a message are universal, from (Unitarian) Julia Ward Howe’s “Mother’s Day Proclamation” to the women of Northern Ireland who set aside their differences to work for peace. Rev. Andrew Clive Millard has served as minister to the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of the Peninsula in
Newport News VA since 2010. Born in England, he came to the United States to be a physicist and then found religion by way of environmentalism. Andrew lives in Yorktown VA with Allison and their four-going-on-fourteen year old daughter, Olivia. He looks forward to returning to UUCOB for his first pulpit swap with Rev. David.

May 21 – Early Days of UUCOB – Reverend David Morris
Drawing on thoughts and memories of different “generations” of members, we look across thirty years of Unitarian Universalism on the Outer Banks. The service will be followed by a potluck picnic on the grounds; the Board will provide fried chicken and a vegan alternative entrée, and all are invited to bring a dish to pass. We will dance and weave our UUCOB Maypole before lunch!

May 28 – Knowledge, Opinion, and Faith at the UUCOB – Dennis Tromba et al
A both light hearted and deadly serious examination of the cognitive dynamics through which our mutual association at the UUCOB is made manifest. The thesis of the presentation is that one or two good questions are worth more than a bucket load of easy answers.


Women’s Journey Group – May 10, 10:30 a.m.
Facilitator: Joan Liston
Topic: Happiness


Shavings From the Board
(Notes from the April 13 Board Meeting)
– 69% of budgeted amount has already been pledged
– The Congregational meeting will be June 11, 2017
– Rev. Morris is planning to offer monthly meetings for the entire OBX community entitled Sustaining Our Souls
– Thanks to all who accepted the nominating committee requests for UUCOB Board service: Jennifer Gilbreath as president; Merry Mendelson as secretary; Christopher Nave as membership chair; Joe Heard as a member of the 2018 nominating committee; and Kent Zimmeman as a member of the audit committee.

Pledge Drive Update
UUCOB, under the leadership of Finance Chair Sherrie Lemnios, and Treasurer Sandy Anderson, has very successfully ended our 2017-2018 pledge drive. We have a total of 62 pledging members and friends. We thank all of our loyal members and friends for their financial support to enable UUCOB to be a strong and viable spiritual congregation and presence in our community. Respectfully submitted by Sandy Anderson

Heal the World Study Group
Thursday, May 18, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
This drop-in group meets in the meetinghouse the first and third Thursday of each month and is open to all those interested in the work of building a more just world and to join an ongoing exploration of recent books that open powerful new ways of seeing the systems and structures that perpetuate inequality.

Amazon Smile Fundraising
Here’s an easy way to raise money for our congregation when you do your regular shopping on Amazon.com.  Now when you shop at Amazon.com you can go to
https://smile.amazon.com/ch/56-1506553 and .5% of your purchase will be donated to UUCOB. After you put this link in your browser the first time, you can just type smile.amazon in your browser for future shopping and it will take you to Amazon and automatically send us .5% of your purchase.


UUA General Assembly Delegates
UUCOB is entitled to two delegates in addition to Rev. David Morris at our 2017 Justice General Assembly in New Orleans, June 21-25. Are you planning to attend, or would you like to register to attend off-site, participating online in many GA events? If so, and if you’d like to represent us as a delegate, please let a Board member know so that we can name delegates for what will very likely be a historic gathering for our Association. Off-site delegates can vote and participate in all the business of the Association that takes place at GA. The cost of off-site registration is $165. More information is available.

Congregational Meeting – June 11
Save the Date! Annual Congregational Meeting will be following the service on Sunday, June 11.

May Share-the-Plate – Room in the Inn
The Room in the Inn” program offers meals and lodging for homeless persons in the Outer Banks.

April 2017 Newsletter

Download the APRIL 2017 Newsletter (pdf) Best for printing!

April 2A Place of Refuge Reverend David Morris
What does “sanctuary” mean to you?  Many of our congregations are taking part in a movement to offer forms of sanctuary to vulnerable people threatened with state-sanctioned harm.  Do we have a place in the “sanctuary movement?”

April 9 – Holy Thursday – Rosemary Rawlins
As part of The Shared Pulpit series, Rosemary will tell a story that illustrates how helpful it can be to pause, and what happens when we do. How hard is it for you to listen, wait, and receive the gifts you want in life?

April 16Practice Resurrection – Reverend David Morris
Easter Sunday is often celebrated as the specific and literal triumph of Jesus over death.  Poet Wendell Berry’s enigmatic phrase offers a different vision, praising the everyday revivals which keep our life vibrant and meaningful.

April 23 – Rev. Sally White, Guest from Moorehead City
A sermon from the “Shared Pulpit” series.

April 30 – Opening to the Power of Love and Life – Nancy Byrne
Stories about discovery and the wonder of opening to significance. A sermon from the “Shared Pulpit” series.

 

 


Rev. David Morris, Minister.
UUCOB Meetinghouse Office Hours
Tuesdays 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Wednesdays 9:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Thursdays 1 – 5 p.m.
Other times and locations available by appointment. Fridays are for writing and study, and Mondays are his “sacred day off.”  He can be reached by email at minister@uucob.org, and by phone any time at 252-423-3043.

Family Potluck and Game Night – April 14
Join us at 6 p.m. on Friday the 14th of April for a fun, family-friendly, relaxed event.  David will bring a vegan dish. Please bring a dish to share, and a game if you like.

Women’s Journey Group – April 12, 10:30 a.m.
Facilitator: Sandy Anderson
Topic: Chapter 7 from Listening Hearts, Cultivating Ourselves


Art Show and Opening
Our next art show will feature quilts from the Linus Quilt Project. The opening reception will be on Sunday April 2, and the quilts will be on display for the months of April and May. Local quilter Sally Meagher, leader of Project Linus, will speak to us at the reception about these special quilts. The project is now in its 17th year, and has grown from 8 quilters making 34 quilts to 70 quilters making 365 quilts – all of which are made locally and donated to area children who are ill or experiencing trauma in their lives. Contact Gwen Taylor for more information. 715-0559 or gwen@tayloremail.com


Annual Holocaust Remembrance Day
This year’s joint Yom HaShoah service with the Jewish Congregation of the Outer Banks (JCOB) which meets in our meetinghouse, will be held on April 25 at 6:30 p.m.  This service to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust is very moving and all are encouraged to attend.

The service consists of prayers, readings and music.  JCOB held an essay competition for high school students and the two winners from First Flight High School will be reading their essays during the service.

One profound ritual during the service is the “reading of names.”  Ten people will each read a page of names of people who perished in concentration camps.  If you would like to participate in this, please contact George Lurie at gymnix@aol.com or 255-1866.

We hope to have a good representation of our congregation at this important, heartfelt service.


Heal the World Study Group
Thursdays, April 6 and April 20 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
This drop-in group meets in the meetinghouse the first and third Thursday of each month and is open to all those interested in the work of building a more just world and to join an ongoing exploration of recent books that open powerful new ways of seeing the systems and structures that perpetuate inequality.

Amazon Smile Fundraising
Here’s an easy way to raise money for our congregation when you do your regular shopping on Amazon.com.  Now when you shop at Amazon.com use this link and .5% of your purchase will be donated to UUCOB.   After you put this link in your browser the first time, you can just type smile.amazon in your browser for future shopping and it will take you to Amazon and automatically send us .5% of your purchase.

Pledge Drive Update
I am so very pleased to inform our members and friends of the outstanding progress we are making in our 2017-2018 UUCOB pledge drive.  As of Sunday, April 2 we have received 13 pledging units, for a total pledge amount of $22,265 which is almost half (exactly 49.6% ) of our preliminary budgeted pledge  request .  Thank you all for stepping forward and pledging as generously as you have done.  We still are awaiting more than half of the pledges to come in.  There are extra pledge forms on the back table at UUCOB.  If our pledge drive continues at this great rate hopefully we can increase the amount in our final budget to increase our minister’s salary.  Thank you again for showing your support to UUCOB. Sandra C. Anderson , Treasurer

UUA General Assembly in New Orleans, June 21-25
Registration and Housing for GA opened March 1. Rooms often sell out. If you’re thinking of attending GA, please know that the number of guests staying at the “official” conference hotels helps to secure meeting space for the Assembly as well as gains support for the environmental and fair employment practices the UUA negotiates with the hotels. It would be wonderful to take a full complement of delegates plus any more folks who would like to take part in this planned “Justice General Assembly.”  GA is always exciting, and this year promises a powerful and memorable experience.

April Share-the-Plate – Feline Hope
Feline Hope is a private, non-profit organization that operates a “no-kill” animal shelter providing food and shelter, offering medical care, and finding loving homes for homeless kittens and cats.

March 2017 Newsletter

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March 5Filling the Well Reverend David Morris
In a time when our public life seems disfigured by the ugliness of hostility and fear wedded to power, and in times when troubles of our own are too much with us, we need deep resources of healing and strength.  Today, we consider the immense gifts of beauty.

March 12 – Five Steps to Prevent Activist Burnout  – Sara M. Vekasi, M. Div., Eco Chaplain
Sarah is a Buddhist-trained Chaplain who founded and runs an organization called the Eco-Chaplaincy Initiative to work with environmental and social justice activists, providing pastoral support to thousands of activists working in a variety of movements and organizations. She currently lives in Black Mountain, NC.

March 19Commitment Sunday – Reverend David Morris
On this day when we launch our annual Pledge Campaign, Rev. David Morris asks: What do you dream of for your spiritual community?

March 26 – Bryan Jones – White Privilege
A sermon from the “Shared Pulpit” series.


Rev. David Morris, Minister.
UUCOB Meetinghouse Office Hours
Tuesdays 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Wednesdays 9:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Thursdays 1 – 5 p.m.
Other times and locations available by appointment. Fridays are for writing and study, and Mondays are his “sacred day off.”  He can be reached by email at minister@uucob.org, and by phone any time at 252-423-3043.

Family Potluck and Game Night – March 10
Join us Friday the tenth of March for a fun, family-friendly, relaxed event.  David will bring a vegan dish. Please bring a dish to share, and a game if you like.

Women’s Journey Group – March 8, 10:30 a.m.
Facilitator: Sandy Anderson
Topic: Chapter 7 from Listening Hearts, Cultivating Ourselves

Art Opening
There will be a Photography show opening after the service on Sunday, March 5, at 11:45 of the work of Jane Manolas, a freshman at First Flight High School.


Get Ready to Pledge
On March 19, we will kick off our Pledge Drive for fiscal year July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018.  Rev. David will speak on that day about dreams you have for your spiritual community.  You will also hear from several committed members of our congregation throughout the drive on why they pledge their financial support to our beloved community.

I would like to remind you that you do not have to be a member to sign a pledge form.  Of course, we would love to have you join, but if you come to services regularly, just enjoy our events or are glad that we are a beacon of liberal religion and inclusiveness on the Outer Banks, you can also sign a pledge form.  We welcome and appreciate our Pledging Friends.

Please be as generous as you can when you receive your pledge packet on March 19 or soon afterwards.  Anything you can contribute will be appreciated.  Thank you!

Sherrie Lemnios

Finance Chairman 


UUA General Assembly in New Orleans, June 21-25
Registration and Housing for GA opened March 1. Rooms often sell out. If you’re thinking of attending GA, please know that the number of guests staying at the “official” conference hotels helps to secure meeting space for the Assembly as well as gains support for the environmental and fair employment practices the UUA negotiates with the hotels. It would be wonderful to take a full complement of delegates plus any more folks who would like to take part in this planned “Justice General Assembly.”  GA is always exciting, and this year promises a powerful and memorable experience.

March Share-the-Plate – Community Care Clinic of Dare
The Community Care Clinic of Dare serves the lower-income, uninsured persons living or working in Dare County by providing access to basic healthcare and medications. The Clinic is committed to increasing accessibility to healthcare on the Outer Banks.

Heal the World Study Group
As we seek to join or support movements that resist the intersecting inequalities and oppressions that disfigure human relationships, a powerful first step is learning to see the world from the perspectives of marginalized people. Rev. David Morris invites all those interested in the work of building a more just world to join an ongoing exploration of recent books that open powerful new ways of seeing the systems and structures that perpetuate inequality.  For the next few sessions, we will read and consider Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Between the World and Me. Rev. Morris has ordered copies.  As our understanding and compassion grow, we’ll seek ways to put our learning into action together. This group will meet on the 1st and 3rd Thursdays of each month, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Meetinghouse. In February we’ll explore books and ideas related to Black History Month. This is a drop-in group, open to all even if you have not yet read the current book–our conversations are wide-ranging.  Feeling the need to “do something?” Join us!

January 2017 Newsletter

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January 1 – Welcoming the New YearReverend David Morris
This ritual-based service, led by Reverend David Morris, will be a family-friendly opportunity to recognize events of the past year we would like to remember or to release, and to invite in what we would like to see in the coming year.  Please bring a dish to share for a New Year’s brunch after the service.

January 8The Courage to Respond to Racial Inequality – Joan Liston
An exploration of racial inequality and one woman’s personal response to it.  Joan shares how various churches can enlighten views and offer support as racial inequality continues to plague our country today.  Are there steps we can take individually, in small groups or as a congregation to quell this injustice? This is the third in our “Shared Pulpit” sermon series.

January 15 – The Courage of Their Convictions – Reverend David Morris
In the light of the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday, we will explore the sources of courage that have sustained people who were struggling against overwhelming odds for freedom and justice.  Where do we find our own courage?

January 22 – Who Is My Neighbor? – Kay Minis, Mano a Hermanos
The rhetoric of our new President’s 2016 campaign was very hostile toward members of the Latino community. What might individuals and families in that community need from us as the new Administration begins?

January 29 – Honoring Our Heritage – Reverend David Morris
In January of 1987, a new Unitarian Universalist congregation was chartered.  What hopes and aspirations did our founders have 30 years ago?  This Sunday we will honor their legacy and consider the next 30 years for UUCOB.

 


Family Potluck and Game Night – January 13
Join us Friday the thirteenth of January  for a fun, family-friendly, relaxed event.  David will bring a vegan dish. Please bring a dish to share, and a game if you like.

Women’s Journey Group – January 11, 10:30 a.m.
Facilitator: Sherrie Lemnios
Topic: Chapter 5 from Listening Hearts, Security, Serenity, Peace of Mind

Heal the World Study Group
As we seek to join or support movements that resist the intersecting inequalities and oppressions that disfigure human relationships, a powerful first step is learning to see the world from the perspectives of marginalized people. Rev. David Morris invites all those interested in the work of building a more just world to join an ongoing exploration of recent books that open powerful new ways of seeing the systems and structures that perpetuate inequality.  Meeting twice a month, we’ll read books like Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me, Rev. William Barber’s The Third Reconstruction, and more.  As our understanding and compassion grow, we’ll seek ways to put our learning into action together. This group will meet on the 1st and 3rd Thursdays of each month, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Meetinghouse.  Our book beginning in January is Reclaiming Prophetic Witness, by U.U. theologian Paul Rasor, available from the UUA Bookstore online.  This is a drop-in group, open to all even if you have not yet read the current book–our conversations are wide-ranging.  Feeling the need to “do something?” Join us!

January Share-the-PlateCurrituck County Animal Lovers Assistance League
The Currituck County Animal Lovers Assistance League operates the Currituck County Animal Shelter along with a veterinary program to provide disease testing and some treatment and prevention for dogs and cats.  The League is also very proactive in helping animals find new loving, permanent homes.  The Senior Citizens Project includes free transportation of senior citizens and their pet’s to their vet and grooming service, and a discount on pet adoption.

RESCHEDULED: Mojo Collins Performance and Art Opening January 14
Mojo Collins will perform on January 14 at the Unitarian Universalist Meetinghouse.  The concert is part of the congregation’s annual fundraising series, Music at the Meetinghouse, which hosts local artists in a quiet listening environment. Doors open at 7:00 pm. The performance begins at 7:30 pm. Price is $20. Light hors d’oeuvres and desserts, soft drinks, wine and coffee are included in the admission price and will be served before the performance and during intermission.

Mojo, a fourth generation North Carolinian singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, has been performing for six decades and has become a North Carolina Blues and Folk legend.  Born in 1944 in Raleigh, he developed a polished “piedmont style” of finger picking that he learned at an early age from his father, “Wild Bill” Collins.  Now often touted as a musical treasure, he is the recipient of many awards including the prestigious NC Arts Council Fellowship in Music for Songwriting. He has traveled the US performing at venues such as the New Orleans Blues and Jazz Heritage Festival, Spoletto Festival, Pittsburgh Folk Art Festival, Golden Gate Concert Series and the International Slide Guitar Festival. His music is aired in the US and internationally.

His success came from performances with his first band while he was in the US Air Force and later tours with his bands Initial Shock and then Sawbuck. Under contract with Columbia and Fillmore West Records and managed by Bill Graham and David Rubison, he performed with or opened shows for Fleetwood Mac, Janis Joplin and Big Brother & the Holding Company, Steve Miller, Santana, The Grateful Dead, Ike and Tina Turner, Muddy Waters, Leon Redbone, Sly and the Family Stone, Blue Cheer, The Spinners, Maurice Williams and the Zodiacs, Keith Shealy and Stevie Ray Vaughan.  Now a renowned songwriter and guitarist, he is still touring and living his lifelong dream as a professional singer, guitarist, and songwriter calling the Outer Banks home.

While first and foremost, a concert performer, Mojo is also well known for his musical contributions to the environmental and preservation efforts in his home on the Outer Banks. His original songs have helped raise funds for preservation efforts for the Chicamacomico Lifesaving Station, the drive to preserve Jockey’s Ridge as a state park and to help create awareness for the need to relocate Cape Hatteras Lighthouse.  He regards his talent as a gift and believes in giving back and playing it forward by volunteering performances to promote awareness of community needs and for fundraising events.  Another contribution that Mojo thoroughly enjoys is bringing his musical education and workshop programs to students in grades K-12 as well at universities and colleges.

Mojo’s songs are original and wide in their scope. He says, “This concert will feature songs with traces of different music masters that I have studied and who have strongly influenced my music.  After all these years, I have come into my own and can honestly say I have my mojo working!”

It doesn’t matter if he is playing the low down blues, rock, rhythm ‘n blues, folk or a soft ballad, Mojo is a skilled, versatile songwriter and musical artist who gives 110% to every audience regardless of age, venue or size. Arthur Shuey of Blues On Stagesays “Mojo Collins is the Mad Max of East Coast blues performers. He can honestly be described as tough, unique, compassionate, resourceful, observant, expressive, savvy, sincere, honorable and legendary and the list of adjectives goes on from there.”

Mojo’s Art on Exhibition at the Meeting House until March 2
The concert also celebrates the opening of an art exhibit by Mojo that will hang in the Meetinghouse until March 2.  What began as a way to relax from the demands of touring is now a unique art expression reflecting the North Carolina coast in theme and the rhythm of his music. Mojo continues the theme of preservation by painting and carving on reclaimed beach wood from the barrier islands of North Carolina. Painting in acrylic, he often adds three-dimensional accents and frames the pieces in weathered sand fence.
See www.mojocollins.com for more information about Mojo.
See www.uucob.org/music for more information.

December 2016 Newsletter

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December 4 – Mending Fences – Reverend David Morris
Robert Frost, good neighbors, and when it’s important to practice speaking over the walls between us.

December 11 -­‐ Reflections of the Magi -­‐ Rev. Charlie Dieterich
One chapter in the Gospel of Matthew deals with astrology and slaughter, rich and poor, power and escape. It is oddly relevant today. (Rev. Charlie Dieterich is the Minister at the Unitarian Church of Norfolk.

December 18 – Happy Holidays – Reverend David Morris
We’ll celebrate the Solstice turn from darkness into light, and consider why this much-­‐maligned season’s greeting is a proud declaration, not a timid retreat.

December 24 – Christmas Eve by Candlelight (7 p.m.) – Reverend David Morris
Our annual Christmas Eve service, a family-­‐friendly celebration of carols and stories, with beautiful music from our beloved Angelo Sonnesso, will be at 7 p.m. on December 24th. We will close the service singing “Silent Night” by candlelight, first in the Sanctuary and then from the front porch to our Kitty Hawk neighbors. If you’d like to be a reader for one of the Gospel Christmas stories or another reading, please let David know by December 18th. You’re invited to bring a plate of cookies or other holiday treats to share. Warm spiced cider will be provided for a brief social time, and everyone goes home with a treat.

(No service Christmas Day)

 


Rev. David Morris, Minister.
UUCOB Meetinghouse Office Hours
Tuesdays 11 a.m. -­‐ 4 p.m.
Wednesdays 9:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Thursdays 1 -­‐ 5 p.m.
Other times and locations available by appointment. Fridays are for writing and study, and Mondays are his “sacred day off.”
He can be reached by email at minister@uucob.org, and by phone any time at 252-­423­‐3043.


Family Potluck and Game Night – December 9
Join us on Friday, December 9 for a fun, family-­‐friendly, relaxed event. David will bring a vegan dish. Please bring a dish to share, and a game if you like.

Women’s Journey Group – December 14, 10:30 a.m.
Facilitator: Rose Clark
Topic: Chapter four from, Listening Hearts. Souls

Heal the World Reading Group
As we seek to join or support movements that resist the intersecting inequalities and oppressions that disfigure human relationships, a powerful first step can be learning to see the world from the perspectives of marginalized people. Rev. David Morris invites all those interested in the work of building a more just world to join me for an ongoing exploration of recent books that open powerful new ways of seeing the systems and structures that perpetuate inequality. Meeting twice a month, we’ll use a practice, growing out of Liberation Theology, of alternating study, reflection, and action as we read books like Ta-­‐Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me, Rev. William Barber’s The Third Reconstruction, and more together. As our understanding and compassion grow, we’ll seek ways to put our learning into action together. This group will meet on the 1st and 3rd Thursdays of each month, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Meetinghouse. This is a drop-­‐in group, open to all even if you have not yet read the current book-­‐-­‐our conversations are wide-­‐ranging. Feeling the need to “do something?” Join us!

Greening the Meetinghouse – Sunday, December 18
Deck the hall with boughs of holly. . . pine, cedar, mistletoe, and all the indigenous evergreens that make our Outer Banks maritime forests beautiful in winter! Did you know that Unitarian minister Charles Follen introduced the Christmas Tree to America in the 19th century, when the Pagan-­‐rooted tradition of bringing boughs of evergreens to decorate the house was frowned on by polite U.S. society? After the Solstice-­‐themed service on Sunday December 18th, we’ll stay after to decorate the Sanctuary, Foyer, and front porch with beautiful seasonal greens you bring from your gardens and woods at home. Holiday music (we might even sing a carol or two!), cider, cookies, and fun for all ages!

Holiday Service Schedule
We will not have a service on Sunday, December 25th, but invite all to join us Christmas Eve. The service on Sunday, January 1st will be a ritual-­‐based opportunity to reflect on the year past and the year to come, with social time afterward to welcome the new year together. Anyone willing to bring a potluck brunch-­‐ type dish for the New Year’s Day is invited to let David know.

 

Considering Social Justice Ministry: A Congregational Conversation
Unitarian Universalism has long taught that the “Beloved Community” or “Kingdom of God” celebrated in many faith traditions is ours to build in this life, in this world. Working for justice has often been part of our tradition since Unitarians and Universalists organized themselves in the 1800s. In the world that confronts us now, does UUCOB have a role to play, not just as individuals working for causes we care about, but as a faith community? The UUCOB Board and Rev. David Morris invite you to join a Congregational Conversation after the service on Sunday, December 11th to explore whether we wish to have social justice outreach as part of our congregational life, and what that might look like for us. David will facilitate, offering some ideas from other UU congregations and inviting our thoughts-­‐-­‐both on whether this is something for us to take up, and on how we might do so effectively in our Outer Banks home.

December Share-­‐the-­‐Plate – Dare County Friends of Youth
The purpose of the Friends of Youth program is to place an at-­‐risk youth between ages 6-­‐17 with a caring adult volunteer to serve as a role model and friend. The adult volunteer provides the youth with one-­‐on-­‐ one time, a few hours each week, in activities that build self-­‐esteem, strong character and friendship, as well as strengthen ties at home and school.

Sad News
It is with great sadness that we announce the death on November 29th of UUCOB “Founding Friend” Richard Batzler, after more than a year of severe health issues and complications. A participant in the beginnings of our faith community, Dick has for many years been part of our larger congregational family. He has led services and formed many close friendships. Our hearts are with Dick’s family and his many friends. A memorial service will be held at Outer Banks Presbyterian Church on Saturday, January 7, 2017 at 1:00 p.m.

Nelson Henderson, who along with his wife Diane, was a founding member of UUCOB, died on November 1 in Chapel Hill.  A full obituary is online.

November 2016 Newsletter

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November 6 – Be Not AfraidReverend David Morris
As we confront an election in which the stakes are perhaps as high as they ever have been in our country, what are the sources of courage and commitment that will sustain us no matter what the outcome might be?

November 13 – From the Heart – Rev. Judith Dancy- (Guest minister, Quaker from Winston, Salem)
Judith Dancy served as pastoral minister in two Friends meetings, and has worshipped often with UUs across the state. She will discuss similarities between traditional Quakerism and Unitarian Universalism, and acknowledge some of the differences, too. Because Quakers today do not all worship as our Quaker ancestors did, Judith will be speaking of the traditional manner of Friends faith and practice.

November 20 – And How Are the Children? – Reverend David Morris
Tradition suggests that the Maasai people of Southeastern Africa ask each other this question  to determine the health of the community. If the children are well, all is well. What do we find if we ask it of ourselves?

November 27What Life Brings to You – Lola Davis-Jones
Sometimes our lives are not what we dreamed or imagined.  Lola shares what life brought to her and her Father.


Rev. David Morris, Minister.
UUCOB Meetinghouse Office Hours
Tuesdays 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Wednesdays 9:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Thursdays 1 – 5 p.m.
Other times and locations available by appointment. Fridays are for writing and study, and Mondays are his “sacred day off.”
He can be reached by email at minister@uucob.org, and by phone any time at 252-423-3043.


Family Potluck and Game Night – November 11
Join us on Friday, November 11 for a fun, family-friendly, relaxed event.  David will bring a vegan dish. Please bring a dish to share, and a game if you like.

Fall Fantasy Goods and Services Auction – November 5
Saturday, November 5, 2016, the weekend after Halloween, is the date for this year’s Fall Fantasy- also known as the Goods and Services Auction.  We hope you’ll be there, and that you can contribute a good or a service. We are working with an auction program developed and run by a member of UU – 21st century stuff!  The site for our auction is: www.togetherauction.com/uucob.  You can see the items we’ll be auctioning in an online catalog that is updated every time that someone adds something new.  You do not have to log on to view the catalog. Besides the online catalog, we’ll have a printed catalog for the auction. We’ve added childcare this year – helpful if the young ones have a tendency to overbid.

Shavings From the Board: Notes from October 13 Board Meeting
Goods and Services Auction to be held Nov. 5, 2016.  Be sure to check the online catalogue
UUCOB’s 30 year anniversary is 2017.  Contact Rev. Morris to volunteer to assist with this celebration.
Our ministry for families is being initiated by Rev. Morris with an initial meeting with all families who may be interested.
Responsibility for our kitchen will now be under the guidance of the sextons and greeters as a sub-committee under the membership committee.
– Board Secretary Sara Zimmerman

Women’s Journey Group – November 9, 10:30 a.m.
Facilitator: Rosemary Rawlins
Topic: Chapter three from, Listening Hearts. Going Places – Both Physical and Spiritual

Heal the World Reading Group
As we seek to join or support movements that resist the intersecting inequalities and oppressions that disfigure human relationships, a powerful first step can be learning to see the world from the perspectives of marginalized people. Rev. David Morris invites all those interested in the work of building a more just world to join me for an ongoing exploration of recent books that open powerful new ways of seeing the systems and structures that perpetuate inequality.  Meeting twice a month, we’ll use a practice, growing out of Liberation Theology, of alternating study, reflection, and action as we read books like Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me, Rev. William Barber’s The Third Reconstruction, and more together.  As our understanding and compassion grow, we’ll seek ways to put our learning into action together. This group will meet on the 1st and 3rd Thursdays of each month, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Meeting House.  Attendance is drop-in, but signups are encouraged for planning purposes.

30th Anniversary Celebration
Nearly 30 years ago, a group of progressive thinkers took a walk in Nags Head Woods and set the foundation for a new type of congregation on the Outer Banks.  As we continue to build upon those early efforts, the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Outer Banks will be celebrating the 30th anniversary of its founding in 2017.  As we celebrate this momentous occasion, we are seeking anyone with an interest to serve on a committee with Reverend David Morris and President Joe Heard to help plan and organize events for our 30th Anniversary Celebration.  Please contact David revdamorris@gmail.com or Joe jandcheard@aol.com if you are interested in helping.

November Share-the-PlateN.E.S.T.
The Network for Endangered Sea Turtles is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation and protection of the habitats and migration routes of sea turtles and other marine animals on the Outer Banks of North Carolina from the Virginia border to Oregon Inlet.

Ruth Wyand Performance – November 19
Ruth Wyand returns to perform on November 19 at the Meetinghouse. Ruth will present her original program “Through Their Voices: Female Musical Activists in North Carolina.”
This project is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Through photographs, narratives and live music, Ruth will demonstrate how the songs and stories of six North Carolina women embody their efforts to inspire change and foster greater societal awareness of their causes in both local and national arenas.
The presentation will highlight traditional female Cherokee and Lumbee tribal storytellers, union organizer and balladeer Ella May Wiggins, blues musician Etta Baker, mountain musician Samantha Bumgarner, and conclude with the jazz great Nina Simone. Ruth will contextualize the musical and poetic contributions of these women by sharing a brief overview of their life, struggle and achievement.
Ruth won the Blues Challenge for the Triangle Blues Society in Durham in September and will be going to Memphis in February to represent North Carolina for the International Challenge.  She will be doing a set of acoustic blues after the “Through Their Voices” program for her second set of the evening.
See www.ruthwyand.com for more information about Ruth.
The concert is part of the congregation’s annual fundraising series, Music at the Meetinghouse, which hosts local artists in a quiet listening environment. Doors open at 7:00 pm. The performance begins at 7:30 pm. Price is $20. Light hors d’oeuvres and desserts, soft drinks, wine and coffee will be served before the performance and during intermission.

Upcoming events in this season’s series include a concert and art show opening by Mojo Collins on January 7

Call 252-261-2801 or email info@uucob.org to ask questions. The UU Meeting House is located at 831 Herbert Perry Road at the corner of Kitty Hawk Road. See www.uucob.org/music  or our facebook page for more information.

Thanksgiving at UUCOB
Once again this year, David will host Thanksgiving Dinner at the Meetinghouse for any who would like to share part of this holiday of bounty and gratitude with your UUCOB family.  Turkey, dressing, sweet and mashed potatoes will be provided; you are invited to bring your favorite Thanksgiving side dish, salad, bread, or dessert to share.  Bring friends or family!  We’ll share setup and cleanup, with many hands making light work.  Watch for signup sheets on Sundays in November.

Sextons/Greeters Needed
The Membership Committee is looking for a few new folks to serve as Sextons/Greeters on Sunday mornings.  It’s a great way to get involved with a concrete set of tasks – setup and cleanup before and after the service, handing out Order of Service and helping our newcomers feel welcomed and at home as they arrive.  You’ll have training and support as you learn the role, and you’ll be scheduled about once every 5-6 weeks. For more information or to volunteer please contact Membership Co-Chairs Polli Funk or Ellen Berg.

Help us Serve the Beach Food Pantry
Did you know that UUCOB has a regular day to volunteer at the Beach Food Pantry, helping clients get the food and other items they need?  It’s a great opportunity to learn about one of the realities of life on the Outer Banks–our seasonal economy makes life tough for many families–and to be of service to folks who need a hand in an emergency.  Wouldn’t it be great if we could turn out a full team of enthusiastic folks when our day to work at the Pantry comes?  For more information and to volunteer, contact Membership Co-Chairs Polli Funk (jefpol26@gmail.com) or Ellen Berg. (eberg@outerbankswaterfowl.com).

November Art Show – Opening November 6
Our next art show will feature K. Yen Fine, a local artist and retired architect with beautiful Chinese inspired work in many mediums. The Opening reception will be November 6 at 11:45 am. Please bring refreshments if you are able to do so.

Reverend David Morris to Preach at Interfaith Thanksgiving Service
Each year the North Dare Ministerial Association sponsors an Interfaith Thanksgiving service on the Sunday before Thanksgiving (November 20th at 4 p.m. at the Outer Banks Presbyterian Church).  This year, an extra effort has been made to make the service welcoming to people of all faiths, including inviting that (relatively) new minister at the U.U. Congregation of the Outer Banks to give the sermon!  There’s a fine choir of folks from several congregations (yes, you can join if you want), and beautiful instrumental music by several gifted church musicians.  Our own Nick Hodsdon will lead a song as well!  Put this on your calendar for a chance to celebrate gratitude with our local spiritual neighbors.

October 2016 Newsletter

Download a pdf copy of the October 2016 Newsletter.  Best for printing!

October 2 – Blessed Assurance – Reverend David Morris
For many, one great gift of religious faith is to feel sure that there is a source of goodness which is utterly reliable. Can a faith which appreciates the value of uncertainty and the virtue of doubt offer that gift? Where do we find assurance?

October 9 – Will the Center Hold? – Bryan Jones
As part of our Share the Pulpit series of sermons, Bryan Jones will speak on something that may be bothering a lot of us: Will the Center Hold? Each day seems to bring a fresh shooting, a new protest, more hate speech. Do incendiary campaigns for high office reflect a world coming apart or will sanity prevail? History and faith may inform us.

October 16 – Did I Do That? – Reverend David Morris
Many of us have times in our life’s story when we wish we had made different choices. Regret can often lead toward self-distrust – or toward hiding from our own past. Wholeness of spirit invites another way.

October 23 – The Courage to Respond to Racial Inequality – Joan Liston
An exploration of racial inequality and one woman’s personal response to it. Joan shares how various churches can enlighten views and offer support as racial inequality continues to plague our country today. Are there steps we can take individually, in small groups or as a congregation to quell this injustice?

October 30 – Good Grief – Reverend David Morris (All Souls Service)
Those of us who live on after a loved one has died walk a spiral path through grief and loss. As we invoke the presence of our loved ones in the All Souls observance, David explores the necessary journey of grieving and healing.


Family Potluck and Game Night – October 14
Join us on Friday, October 14 for a fun, family-friendly, relaxed event. David will bring a vegan dish. Please bring a dish to share, and a game if you like.


Fall Fantasy Goods and Services Auction – November 5
Deadline for Auction Donations – October 22

Saturday, November 5, 2016, the weekend after Halloween, is the date for this year’s Fall Fantasy- also known as the Goods and Services Auction. We hope you’ll be there, and that you can contribute a good or a service. Also, it would be cool if you could ask a business (or businesses) for a donation. We have a script suggestion if you’d feel better working with it when approaching a business. (We have found that threats really don’t work…) AND: We are working with an auction program developed and run by a member of UU – 21st century stuff! The site for our auction is: www.togetherauction.com/uucob. You can see the items we’ll be auctioning in an online catalog that is updated every time that someone adds something new. You do not have to log on to view the catalog. We have entered into the program our members and friends. Just enter your phone number and then the last 4 digits of your number, and you can add your own items. If you’re not on the list, you’ll have a chance to join. And – you can add items of your own to auction. If you’d rather have us do it, no problem. We’ll have forms for donations, forms for business donations, and hints for talking to businesses about donations at a table near the coffee every Sunday until October 22. That’s an important date, because it’s the deadline for donations. Besides the online catalog, we’ll have a printed catalog for the auction. We’ve added childcare this year – helpful if the young ones have a tendency to overbid. Donation deadline: October 22nd. Auction: November 5th.


Women’s Journey Group – October 18, 10:30 a.m.
Facilitator: Ellen Berg
Topic: Your Sanctuary. Chapter two from, Listening Hearts.


Touching the Center: Everyday Spiritual Practices
Sometimes, the world just seems too complicated. In the hurry and demands of everyday life, surrounded by the clatter and chatter of a society that too often listens first to voices of greed, hostility, suspicion, and anger, we can find it hard to stay centered. How can we take time to touch the very heart of compassion each day, to remind ourselves to live in deep relationship with the source of all that is good? Join Rev. David Morris Saturday, October 22nd from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. for an exploration of simple, realistic spiritual practices that can ground and sustain us. We’ll share practices that participants have used, learn about a few others, and try some on together for a day of reflection, sharing, and renewal.

Heal the World Reading Group
As we seek to join or support movements that resist the intersecting inequalities and oppressions that disfigure human relationships, a powerful first step can be learning to see the world from the perspectives of marginalized people. Rev. David Morris invites all those interested in the work of building a more just world to join me for an ongoing exploration of recent books that open powerful new ways of seeing the systems and structures that perpetuate inequality. Meeting twice a month, we’ll use a practice, growing out of Liberation Theology, of alternating study, reflection, and action as we read books like Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me, Rev. William Barber’s The Third Reconstruction, and more together. As our understanding and compassion grow, we’ll seek ways to put our learning into action together. This group will meet on the 1st and 3rd Thursdays of each month, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Meeting House. Attendance is drop-in, but signups are encouraged for planning purposes.


30th Anniversary Celebration
Nearly 30 years ago, a group of progressive thinkers took a walk in Nags Head Woods and set the foundation for a new type of congregation on the Outer Banks. As we continue to build upon those early efforts, the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Outer Banks will be celebrating the 30th anniversary of its founding in 2017. As we celebrate this momentous occasion, we are seeking anyone with an interest to serve on a committee with Reverend David Morris and President Joe Heard to help plan and organize events for our 30th Anniversary Celebration. Please contact David revdamorris@gmail.com or Joe jandcheard@aol.com if you are interested in helping.


Exploring Our Ministry to Families
What might we offer for our children? Parents and others interested in programming for our youngest UUCOB folks are invited to join Rev. David Morris for a conversation about what we can create together. We’ll meet after the service on Sunday, October 30th to explore together, considering some ideas from David and looking for other suggestions. Let’s make sure that UUCOB is truly welcoming and supportive of ALL people, of every age.


October Share-the-Plate – Outer Banks Cancer Support Group
The Outer Banks Cancer Support Group provides transportation stipends to patients for doctor visits, and they pay bills (rent, car payments, etc.) for those in treatment who are unable to work during that time.


All Souls Service on October 30
For our All Souls observance on Sunday, October 30th, we will once again create a table decorated in the spirit of the Mexican Dia de los Muertos and Pagan Samhain, with pictures and mementos from our loved ones who have died. Please be sure to bring a small picture to include. Anyone who has Samhain or Dia de los Muertos décor you’d be willing to share is invited to contact David by October 21st to assist in planning the table.

All Souls Procession – We will begin our October 30th All Souls observance with a simple procession of those who have lost loved ones this year (since November 2015), with candles to add to the All Souls table. If someone you loved has died this year and you would like to honor them in this way, please contact David by October 26th to be included.

September 2016 Newsletter

Download the SEPTEMBER 2016 Newsletter (pdf). Best for printing!

September 4Pour Yourself InReverend David Morris
Our community life is made up of the precious gifts each of us offers, gifts of ourselves and of the experiences of our lives.  This Water Communion Sunday we celebrate and reflect on what each of us brings and how we are enriched in joining together.  Please bring a small amount of water representing some important place or experience in your past year to share in our Water Communion Ceremony. We will share the water in a common vessel to represent the way the streams of our lives flow together in community.

September 11 – Heroes, Service and Compassion Jan DeBlieu
There are many kinds of heroes.  They include courageous first responders who rush into burning buildings – and those whose deep compassion quietly changes lives.  We may never have reason to pull anyone from a burning building, but we can learn to respond lovingly to the more common cries for help we encounter everyday.  And in doing that, perhaps we can make the world a safer, more loving place.

September 18A Moral Revolution  – Reverend David Morris
“Power yields nothing without a demand,” Frederick Douglass declared.  As we seek to engage the great social disparities and the issues of our age, what is our truth to speak to power?

September 25Aging as a Spiritual JourneyRev. Sally White, UU Congregation of Morehead City
If we are lucky, every one of us ages.  If we are wise, we age well, balancing in the process physical ripening and then decline with spiritual deepening and then ascent.  Using insights from reading and from life, Rev. Sally will offer some thoughts on aging well, and on the particular gifts that age can bestow on individuals and on society.


Rev. David Morris, Minister.
UUCOB Meetinghouse Office Hours
Tuesdays 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Wednesdays 9:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Thursdays 1 – 5 p.m.
Other times and locations available by appointment. Fridays are for writing and study, and Mondays are his “sacred day off.”
He can be reached by email at minister@uucob.org, and by phone any time at 252-423-3043.


Family Potluck and Game Night – September 9
Our Second Friday Potluck and Game Night is back.  Join us on Friday, September 9 for a fun, family-friendly, relaxed event.  David will bring a vegan dish. Please bring a dish to share, and a game if you like.

Riff Tides Performance – September 17
The Riff Tides, consisting of some of our members and friends, will be back again to start off this season’s “Music at the Meetinghouse” concert series.  They will be playing 50’s music with new material and a new member, Paul Lescowitz on Saxophone.

The other members are: Andrew Darling – Bass, Ken Daidone – Drums, Robert Jacobs – accordion, Angelo Sonnesso – keyboards & vocals, Kent Zimmerman and Dana Walker – vocals.  Our own minister, David Morris, will appear as a guest, sitting in on some vocals.

Admission is $20, which includes light hors d’oeuvres, desserts, soft drinks, wine and coffee.   Doors open at 7:00; the concert starts at 7:30.

Don’t miss this toe-tapping event, especially if you are inclined to get up and dance.  Support our congregation and have a good time listening to happy music.

Women’s Journey Group – September 21, 10:30 a.m.
Facilitator: Joan Liston
Topic: Gathering Number One from the new book, Listening Hearts, entitled, “Snapshots of Our Lives.”  Please bring 3 photos: one from childhood, one from the mid-point of your life and a present one.  If willing, please be ready to share your faith journey during those three periods of your life.

Photography Show – September/October
Opening Sunday, September 11
Linda Lauby is a writer, artist, restaurant designer and displaced Cheesehead, who moved from her native Wisconsin to New York City after attending the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

While working in the corporate world as a writer and desktop publishing consultant for such clients as Sports Illustrated, Citibank, Security Traders Monthly, Playboy, Bank Julius Baer, Warwick Advertising and United Parcel Service, she discovered the Outer Banks. Trading suits and a briefcase for tide charts and flip-flops, she moved here 24 years ago and never looked back. She lives in Southern Shores and owns Outer Banks Press, a selectively-small publishing company that in part produces distinctive regional magazines and bespoke books of literary, artistic and photographic merit. Outer Banks Press also sponsors public art projects — such as the Winged Horse Extravaganza and Pony OBXpress — with the goal of further promoting the arts and protecting our natural resources while celebrating life on these barrier islands.

Although Linda’s first loves are illustration and painting, photography and graphic design have always been part of her work with Outer Banks Press. In 2007, while working on some new artwork for a restaurant in Richmond, Virginia, she began altering some of her industrial photographs, layering, enhancing and otherwise manipulating many images to create a composite. In some instances, up to 20 different photographs are combined to create one final image. She employs the term “artography” to describe this artful manipulation of digital images presented as fine art giclees, and her work has become popular among collectors.

Some of the pieces in this show are Outer Banks images, while others are decidedly industrial.   “These pictures are my translation of what I see and feel,” says Linda. “Many pieces also seem to illustrate society gone awry; I’ll leave it to the individual viewer to form his or her own interpretation.”

Plan to stay after the service Sunday, September 11, for an opening reception with the artist.

Touching the Center: Everyday Spiritual Practices
Sometimes, the world just seems too complicated.  In the hurry and demands of everyday life, surrounded by the clatter and chatter of a society that too often listens first to voices of greed, hostility, suspicion, and anger, we can find it hard to stay centered.  How can we take time to touch the very heart of compassion each day, to remind ourselves to live in deep relationship with the source of all that is good?  Join Rev. David Morris Saturday, October 22nd from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. for an exploration of simple, realistic spiritual practices that can ground and sustain us.  We’ll share practices that participants have used, learn about a few others, and try some on together for a day of reflection, sharing, and renewal.

Heal the World Reading Group
As we seek to join or support movements that resist the intersecting inequalities and oppressions that disfigure human relationships, a powerful first step can be learning to see the world from the perspectives of marginalized people. Rev. David Morris invites all those interested in the work of building a more just world to join me for an ongoing exploration of recent books that open powerful new ways of seeing the systems and structures that perpetuate inequality.  Meeting twice a month, we’ll use a practice, growing out of Liberation Theology, of alternating study, reflection, and action as we read books like Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me, Rev. William Barber’s The Third Reconstruction, and more together.  As our understanding and compassion grow, we’ll seek ways to put our learning into action together. This group will meet on the 1st and 3rd Thursdays of each month, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Meeting House.  Attendance is drop-in, but signups are encouraged for planning purposes.

Getting to Know UU
New to our congregation?  Wanting to know more about this thing called Unitarian Universalism–where it comes from, what it looks like beyond our congregation, what it means to make it part of your life?  Join Rev. David Morris after the service on Sunday, September 18th for a brief (about 45 minutes) introductory conversation.  This is a preview for the longer Newcomer’s Class to be offered in October, and both are highly encouraged for all who are considering membership or who have recently joined.

September Share-the-PlateBeach Food Pantry
The Beach Food Pantry provides food to needy Dare County residents in a temporary crisis or emergency situation. The people and families served are referred by the Dare County Department of Social Services (DSS), Interfaith Community Outreach (ICO), and 14 member religious organizations.

Save the Date!  Goods and Services Auction
And the date is Saturday, November 5.  Our goods and services auction is back, with an upgrade. In this case, change is definitely a good thing.  The theme this year is “Fall Fantasy”.  (After all, it’s right after Halloween and right before Election Day…)
We’re using the term “upgrade” because we’re also taking the auction into Cyberspace for the first time.  In addition to being able to donate items via a printed form, you can also donate online, using software created by a Unitarian Universalist developer.  We started accepting donations last Sunday.  Every week from now to October 22, we’ll have a table at each service with everything you’ll need to need to participate: donor forms, letter of introduction to businesses, list of businesses to solicit, current list of businesses that have been solicited and a script to use when requesting donations.  Be sure to check by the table each Sunday.
Details on using the online donation forms will be in the weekly announcements
So yes, save the date – Saturday, November 5th, for auction, eats, entertainment and fun.
(Fun, like change, is good!)

News From the Unitarian Universalist Association

Fortification – New Standing on the Side of Love Podcast
This fall Standing on the Side of Love is thrilled to bring you fortification: a podcast about the spiritual lives and spiritual sustenance of leaders in social justice movements.
Episodes will be released on iTunes, SoundCloud and our website every other Tuesday through the end of the year. We’ll have additional information about our guests, the work they do and how you can get involved on our website. The first episode, featuring Lena K. Gardner and Rev. Sekou, is available here.

Baton Rouge Flood Relief Efforts
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and surrounding areas have been inundated with historic flooding.
Unitarian Universalists from outside greater Baton Rouge want to know how to help from afar. The Unitarian Church of Baton Rouge has set-up a fund for contributions and offers additional, recently updated, how to help information. Learn more about how you can help with flood relief efforts here.
Thank you for reaching out with your prayers, cares, and concerns.

North Carolina 

September 16-18, OWL Facilitator Training. Flat Rock, NC. Learn more and register here.

October 2-7, Southern UU Fall Institute (SUUFI) at The Mountain. SUUFI 2016 explores Creative Play. Quick video, flyer, schedule, reviews, and other details available here.

October 8, Environmental Collaboratory of North Carolina UUs, hosted by the Community Church of Chapel Hill Unitarian Universalist. Gather for a day of connecting and collaborating around how to lift up the Seventh Principle in our state. Learn more here.

October 19-23, UU Womenspirit Fall Retreat at The Mountain. Moon Energy: Rhythm, Mystery, Illumination. Learn more and register here.

The Mountain Retreat and Learning Center
The Mountain, founded in 1979 by Unitarian Universalists, is a nonprofit, year round retreat center and summer camp open to all. The Mountain is located in Highlands, NC and is approximately a two hour drive from Atlanta, GA, Greenville, SC and Asheville, NC.
Visit our website, http://themountainrlc.org, to learn more.

September Book Drive
The Program Committee is taking orders for additional copies of Singing the Journey (Teal Hymnal) through the month of September, so we have enough to go around as our congregation grows. If you would like to purchase a hymnal in the name of a loved one who has passed away or in honor of someone you cherish, we will affix a book sticker inside the book you donate that states:

This book was given by…

in loving memory of… (or) in honor of …

~2016~

The Price for each book is $15.00

——————

If interested, please print and complete the UUCOB Book Donor form and give funds (cash or check) to Sandy Anderson, Rosemary Rawlings or Rose Clark at Sunday services before September 30. Extra forms will be available in church. A tear off receipt is included for your tax purposes. Please complete a separate form for each donation.

The donation form can be found in the SEPTEMBER 2016 Newsletter (pdf).

August 2016 Newsletter

Download the August 2016 Newsletter (pdf) Best for printing!

August 7 – A Larger Hope – Reverend David Morris
We’re used to thinking of “hope” as synonymous with optimism for a particular outcome.  When the outcome seems dubious at best, do we lose hope?  What kind of hope is sustainable in the face of uncertain outcomes?

August 14 – Standing Up For Each Other in the Trenches – Rosemary Rawlins
Our small communities are the strongholds of our mental and emotional health because this is where life happens. Can our UU values give us the courage to stand up for others in tumultuous times?  

August 21 – We Would Be One – Reverend David Morris
In the dance of community life, we sometimes struggle with our high regard for individual autonomy.  How do we balance the values of freedom and unity?

August 28 – Jazz and Poetry – Sarah Munson and Robert Jacobs
Sarah Munson, our summer resident poet, and Robert Jacobs, our versatile pianist, will head up our annual jazz/poetry service.  Bring your favorite poem to share to enrich our service even further. Contact Sarah to give her an idea of what you wish to bring.


Family Potluck and Game Night Returns
Our Second Friday Potluck and Game Night is back. This fun, family-friendly, relaxed event will resume on Friday, August 12th! David will bring a vegan dish. Please bring a dish to share, and a game if you like.

GEM Art Show
Our next art show will feature the work of clients of GEM, Adult Services, Inc. along with that of the local artists who taught the art classes for the GEM clients. The opening reception will be Sunday August 5 at 12 noon. UUCOB member Gail Sonnesso will make the opening remarks for GEM. We expect many GEM clients, artists and community people to attend, as this project was supported by the Dare County Arts Council and a grant from the Outer Banks Community Foundation.

August Share-the-Plate – Feline Fix Foundation
The Feline Fix Foundation uses trap-neuter-return methods to safely reduce the Outer Banks’ feral and homeless cat population.  They provide assistance with trapping, low-cost spay/neuter surgery, rabies prevention, ear tipping, and returning.

Outer Banks Food Pantry
We are hoping to re-energize our First Sunday Food Collection for the Outer Banks Food Pantry. Please remember to bring canned or dry goods for our baskets. First Sundays especially, but any time will do!

UUCOB Board Meeting and Retreat Summary – July 27, 2016
UUCOB board discussion was centered on reviewing a covenant which reflects the board’s commitment to support the efforts of our minister, fellow board members, and our congregation.  New board members were welcomed. Roles and responsibilities of each committee and executive committee member were reviewed.  UUCOB bylaws were distributed.  Committee chairs outlined their priorities for the coming year. The event calendar of 2016-2017 was developed and will be published soon.  The treasurer noted that our mortgage will be paid in full November 2017.  Regular meeting times and dates were set for the board.  This will be the 2nd Thursday of each month at 5:30PM.  The next meeting will be on August 11, 2016.  Any interested member is invited to attend.